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VASKO

THE PATCH

BLUES

BG

He started his musical career in the 1980s, playing as a drummer in Parallel 42 in the Scandinavian countries (1984-1986), and in “Start” of Mimi Ivanova and Razvigor Popov (1986-1989). In September 1989 he set up the Poduene blues band, which is one of the first blues band in Bulgaria. His songs have been influenced by the end of the communist regime. Thus Vasko became one of the most popular figures in Bulgaria in the early 90's. From the start period of their career among their famous songs are "Burokrat", "Sunny Beach blues" and "Communism is gone".
He participated in many meetings, barricades and other events to overthrow the communist regime. He had tours in Bulgaria and abroad, he played in the prison in Buhovo, in Hall 1 in the National Palace of Culture, from the roof of Garibaldi Square in Sofia, in the basement of the theater "La Strada", at the barricades in Dupnitsa, at the welcoming concert of Bill Clinton in Sofia, he performed concerts for sick children and orphanages, participated in noisy rock concerts, at the Super Blues Festival Bucurest '95 with headliner John Maill, he played from the rooftop of a moving bus at the Festival of Tarrakeikata in Plovdiv, participated in Blues Fest Bourgas, beer festivals in Sofia and others, in the Heineken’s brasserie in Amsterdam, in a school for diplomats in Bonn, in the prison in Cologne, in Jazzgalerie Bonna, Jazz House Kansas City and Buddy Guy's Leggents – Chicago. He has participated all over Europe, as well as on tour in America. He is also was touring in Australia and New Zealand.
In 2009 he was the headliner of the Blues Goes East Festival in Karlsruhe, 2014 CLUJ BLUES FEST and DANUBE JAZZ & BLUES in Romania.
Two of Vasko the Patch songs are taught in music books -"100 Years Rocknroll" and "Let It Be Light".
On May 24 2018, five of his songs’ texts, and more specifically- "Communism Goes," "The Dog of the End Neighborhood," "Let It Be Light," "Day after Day," and "Emigrants" enter the US Congress Library in the "Ljuboslov" almanac, a yearbook of Bulgarian writers in the United States and around the world.